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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 76 (some duplicates have been removed)
tonight. landscaper found body in bushes outside the city today. he killed one man, critically wounded another and they believe shot himself. there is breaking news now on fox news channel. explosion has just torn through a building in a major north american city. this is brand new video in to us. emergency crews gather around first floor of office building in mexico city. headquarters of the state run oil company. there may have been a buildup of gas in lower level of the building and then the explosion. there is no way to tell what happened there. trace gallagher is watching this. we have new information on the victims? >> mexican television reporting that five people are dead. 75 injured. at least 30 people trapped under ground. this is the early going, of course, and the numbers will change. now they are calling in question the structural integrity of the building. this at one time was one of the tallest buildings mexico city. thousands of people work inside. this is mexico. the government is at war with the cartel. if it was deliberate it would be attack on government. in recent d
." -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com >>> but we begin in new orleans. a city deeply embarrassed by the power blackout that interrupted potentially could have changed the course of the super bowl. this is much more than a sports story. it's raising very serious questions about the city's readiness to host big events. cnn's brian todd is in new orleans for us. he's got the very latest on this investigation on what happened during that blackout. brian, what are you learning? >> reporter: wolf, learning some incremental things about the investigation. how it's proceeding, how they're looking into it. and what's interesting is the two entries responsible for handling the power and electricity to the superdome, they're the ones handling it. at various times over the past less than 24 hours since this happened, both of them have said they essentially didn't do anything wrong. this was a dramatic event. starting right as the third quarter got under way in the superdome last night. we've got video of the lights going out. we've got the video of cbs sports which in tandem with showtime was doing a beh
bowl before. since that time, you had the b.p. disaster last year, katrina in 2005. this city is ready to show off how much they improved. >>gretchen: brian, so glad you made it there after the weather we experienced here. you're looking ready to go for the weekend. we'll be back in touch in a moment. we have too bring people up to speed on headlines. a third day of tense hostage situation. this is alabama. that man is still holding a boy in an underground bunker. cops haven't released the name but he's known to stay in the bunker for up to eight days. and he holds anti-american views. cops say the boy is being allowed to take medication and watch tv. >> an alaska airlines flight heading for seattle forced to make an emergency landing after one of the pilots reportedly passed out. the copilot landed the plane safely in portland. the pilot was taken to the hospital. no word on his condition. no one else was hurt. >> wicked weather causing massive pileups in the midwest. this is the scene in detroit. heavy snow and whiteout conditions leading to the wreck. at least three people were kill
of the city? >> reporter: bill, that's the thing. it is unusual to see this sort of thing to happen in the beating heart of the turkish capital which is so very secured. there are a lot of police officers around. embassy is very close to the turkish parliament. it is not what you would expect here. we don't know that there were any threats but we do know that turkey is on of the edge these days with the conflict in syria, right on its border and some other things going on. but we did not hear, bill, of any sort of a threat. back to you. bill: amy kellogg. work your source. we'll be back in touch with london. here is martha with more. martha. martha: there is no word yet exactly who is behind this attack. there too soon to know who is behind this attack at this point. the worker's party known as pkk in october of 2011, the pkk killed 26 security forces. that was the deadliest attack since 1993. the u.s. provided turkey with over $5 million since 2010 for anti-terrorism and related programs to that. bill: the region, the amy referred to a little bit of this. there are so many hot spot
to work together to protect our greatest resource. the children of the city of chicago. >> we need to get murderers off the street. if they do it once they will do it again. >> the 15-year-old girl made the anti-gang video, when she was in the 6th grade. and urged kids in the video to say no to gangs and yes to a great future. imagine just at the inauguration, time of her life, young girl representing the president's city. and gunned down days later. an innocent bystander. gang members are going at it. chicago has had a bloody violent last few years. >> here we go again with the gun control debate. part and parcel. >> it is. you wonder. last two years in this country. 23,000, 24,000 people have been killed by guns. that is a lot. you are wondering is it getting attention because in light of newtown the media is covering it. 30 people killed today by guns in america. networks seem to be covering it more. which makes the problem look worse. the media covering it a little more. because of newtown. >> the problem has been there. it is getting coverage. opening up discussion which hopefully op
'll ask new york city mayor's michael bloomberg if he'll run for president in 2016. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >> let's begin today with the rally on wall street. major gains that can affect your retirement savings and more. dow jones industrials completely erased a steep drop earlier in the week. let's go live to felicia taylor in new york. what happened, felicia? >> ben bernanke in his testimony in washington basically saying that we are going to see quantitative easing through 2016. that's what the market is focused on. yes, we've got better than expected numbers on manufacturing and home sales but when they heard that ben bernanke still believes we aren't going to see unemployment drop to 6.5% until 2016, that means stimulus measures are going to be in place and that's what wall street wants to hear. wo wolf? >> the 14,060, the market had collapsed in 2009, as all of us know, because of the housing crisis. it was down at one point well below 7,000, approaching 6500 and now it's more than doubled. it's a pretty dramatic comeback. >> absolutely. no question about
cowboy urge need wyatt earp to come in and clean up dodge city. and that's "hardball" for now. thanks for being with us. "the ed show" with ed schultz starts right now. >>> good evening, americans, and welcome to "the ed show" from new york. meteors crashing into earth. congress goes on vacation again? and elizabeth warren is the new sheriff in town. all that and rachel maddow joins us tonight. buckle up. this is "the ed show." let's get to work. just like the meteor slamming into russia, elizabeth warren is already banging heads in the senate. >> the question i really want to ask is about how tough you are. >> we'll show you how the new sheriff of wall street is outclassing her fellow freshmen, and how the new cop on the beat means trouble for big banks. >>> ten years after george w. bush dragged the country into war in iraq, and explosive new documentary narrated by rachel maddow details the trail of deception like never before. rachel joins me to preview the film tonight. >>> plus, the big congressional panel on john boehner's decision to go on vacation before we go off another cli
warfare are both relatively recent inventions. they were only made possible by the rise of the first city-states in mesopotamia about 5,000 years ago. by definition you could not have a conventional army without a state, and so until you had states, you had no conventional armies which had officers and enlisted ranks and a bureaucracy and logistics and all these other things that we associate with conventional armed forces. but guess what? as soon as you had the very first city-states in mesopotamia, they were immediately being attacked by know e mass from the persian -- nomads from the persian highlands. essentially, guerrillas. and so from the very start organized militaries have always spent a lot of their time fighting unconventional, irregular warfare. and you know what? those terms don't make a heck of a lot ofceps. that's one of the big takeaways i had from doing six years of reading and research for this book. the way we think about this spire subject is all messed up -- entire subject is all messed up. we think that somehow conventional warfare is the norm, that the way you ought
at stake and both cities have something to offer. so we have a few possibilities right here. >> as i talk about it how about you munch on it. we have sourdough bread, not chicken, sourdough bread. thank you, we have the sourdough bread from san francisco. the most famous, sourdough bread in the u.s. a form of french bread uses bacteria instead of yeast. maybe not the most appetizing detail. it is interesting. and been in continuous production since 1849. not so famous as in san francisco, ghirardelli chocolate, found in 1862 by delmonico, ghirardelli, second oldest chocolate in the u.s., baker's chocolate. 1893. ghirardelli square in san francisco. >> delicious actually. >> very good. >> baltimore. a place where i lived. the mayor of baltimore's disclaimer, a good friend of mine, stephanie rollins blake, and crab cakes are the big thing there. associated with the chesapeake bay, maryland and baltimore. crab cakes are great. the boardwalk crab cakes, breaded, deep fried and filled with stuffing of various things served on a bun. now the restaurant, aka, gourmet crab cakes prepared with no
back marcus allen and his take on concussions and kids in the sport and the clash in the crescent city. president obama shifting focus back to the economy after encouraging economic news friday. >> home prices are starting to climb again and car sales at a five-year high. manufacturing is roaring back. the business created 2.2 million jobs last year and our economy created more jobs than econom t economists originally thought. >> jones industrial average closed about 14,000 on friday, the highest since 2007. the los angeles mayor has put an end to speculation that he will be joining the obama cabinet. there is talk he might be transportation secretary. he said he will finish out his term as mayor. in massachusetts, former senator scott brown said he will not be running for the senate seat vacated by john kerry, but there is speculation that brown could have his eye on the governor's seat when patrick steps down in 2014. we will take you to boston to big deeper into that story later in the show. a whole lot to get to first. vice president biden is in germany and talking international s
city, a rematch of last year's nba finals. thunder trying to prove they can beat lebron and the heat. they did nothing of the sort last night. didn't start well for durant. doesn't get the call. draws a technical for pounding the floor. later in the first, scary moment for durant and the thunder. he goes for the rebound, falls and slams his shoulder. they don't want to see that. he did stay down but refused to leave the game and scored 40 points. i guess he's okay. fourth quarter, lebron looking to keep his record going of scoring over 30 points. with a field goal percentage of 60% or higher. he sinks the deep three, gives the heat a 15-point lead. later in the quarter he elevates, throws down the alley-oop. heat win. lebron with another big night, he shot 39 but shot a mere 58%. his historic streak is over, but the heat are cruising and lebron playing out of his mind. >>> kevin youkilis not endearing himself to his fan base. he played for the red sox for eight years. he showed up for his first day of spring training with the yankees and told reporters, quote, i will always be a red
for your police force for all of philadelphia. but in reality, if you can't cover the city and you can do a lot of things, the one s.w.a.t. team can never be decisive. that is where we found ourselves the begin with a significant evolution and it began to change dramatically. >> in somalia, the task force ranger had be been there a month or two before the big battle that i wrote about. during that time, they had launched six missions. so the pace was intelligence gathering, finding targets, planning and operations, sometimes very quickly. once that intelligence came together, then launching it. described what a temporal up-tempo means and how that applied in iraq? >> that's exactly right. there were eight series of these that happened a number of days apart. so you gather intel, you get it together, you make a decision. you set yourself criteria to launch when the criteria are there. but it's a pretty centralized, deliberate process. we were originally doing that, and we would have this precise thing. what we found is that we were having a very narrow slow effect. we would capture all tho
, and french troops now have occupied the airport at a third key city-- kidal. in paris today, the french defense minister said his government is open to having u.n. peacekeepers take over, with french support. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to jeff. >> brown: and we turn to two stories about conflict in the middle east. as the battle in syria between president bashar al-assad's forces and the free syrian army or f.s.a. rages on, thousands of refugees flood into neighboring countries. jonathan miller of "independent television news" takes us to a secret crossing point on the border with jordan on the outskirts of the syrian city of da'-raa. >> reporter: katiba jaber is a lonely place, exposed to desert winds that chill you to the bone. the border guard is ready for what the night will bring. ( gunfire ) the shooting started shortly after sunset. those are close. the syrians fire at the jordanians every night but the jordanians don't fire back. and bashar's forces shoot and shell the groups of refugees hiding somewhere down there in the darkness. unexpectedly, a jorda
york times." he called koch the master showman of city hall who parlayed shrewd political instincts and plenty of chutzpah in three tumultuous terms of mayor of new york with all the tenacity, zest, and combativeness that personified his city of golden dreams. he used to walk the streets of new york asking how am i doing? ed koch was 88. [ kitt ] you know what's impressive? a talking car. but i'll tell you what impresses me. a talking train. this ge locomotive can tell you exactly where it is, what it's carrying, while using less fuel. delivering whatever the world needs, when it needs it. ♪ after all, what's the point of talking if you don't have something important to say? ♪ we've decided to we're all having such a somegreat year in the gulf, put aside our rivalry. 'cause all our states are great. and now is when the gulf gets even better. the beaches and waters couldn't be more beautiful. take a boat ride or just lay in the sun. enjoy the wildlife and natural beauty. and don't forget our amazing seafood. so come to the gulf, you'll have a great time. especially in alabama. yo
fadden's brilliant obituary in today's norgets. he called koch the master showman of city hall who parlayed shrewd political instincts and plenty of chutzpah in three tumultuous terms of mayor of new york with all the tenacity, zest, and combativeness that personified his city of golden dreams. he used to walk the streets of new york asking how am i doing? ed koch was 88. we're all having such a great year in the gulf, we've decided to put aside our rivalry. 'cause all our states are great. and now is when the gulf gets even better. the beaches and waters couldn't be more beautiful. take a boat ride or just lay in the sun. enjoy the wildlife and natural beauty. and don't forget our amazing seafood. so come to the gulf, you'll have a great time. especially in alabama. you mean mississippi. that's florida. say louisiana or there's no dessert. mcfadden's brilliant obituary in he used to walk the streets of of us who call the gulf home. [ woman ] ring. ring. progresso. i just served my mother-in-law your chicken noodle soup but she loved it so much... i told her it was homemade. everyone tells a littl
called koch the master showman of city hall who parlayed shrewd political instincts and plenty of chutzpah in three tumultuous terms of mayor of new york with all the tenacity, zest, and combativeness that personified his city of golden dreams. he used to walk the streets of new york asking how am i doing? ed koch was 88. [ speaking foreign language ] >> well, this is going to be a familiar topic around here. we're back. that was a clip from the documentary "the gatekeepers" which opens in select cities today. the film looks at israel's legendary shin bet, its intelligence agency and interviews six of its former heads. they sound a lot more like chuck hagel than bibi netanyahu. has left to human suffering on the part of the palestinians and has been banned from israel itself. like president obama, they argue for the need to engage your enemies. they say you can't make peace through military means alone. in order, these men wouldn't fit in very well in the republican party in the u.s. right now. they might even get badgered by lindsey graham and ted cruz as we saw in a congressi
for the hour, next. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: the story of dk cheney is the story of power. he served two terms as vice president, president george w. bush from twub two 2008. he was also secretary of defense he was also chief of staff to president gerald ford. the "washington post" has called him the most influential and powerful man ever to hold the office. he was in washington an insider. his story is a story not only of power but because of what happened after 9/11 it's a story of power and values. we begin a conversation that took place in washington. mr. vice predent, thank you very mu for taking time to see us for this conversation. how's your health? >> much, much bet, thank you. i had lived with coronary artery disease since i was 37 years old 1978. had six heart attacks and nearly everything else that you could do yourself. i had an episode of ventricular fibrillation, my heart stopped. my life was saved by an implanted defibrillator. so i've been through a lot a as of last march i got a
finish tonight, it was a very big finish for a meteor the size of a bus as it passed over the city in central russia during morning rush hour today. now, imagine this as you drive to work. a flash in the sky becoming more distinct until it is obvious you are witnessing a rare phenomenon. people saw a streak of light as a meteor passed through the earth's atmosphere, moving at a speed of 12,000 miles per second and bursting into a fireball. i wish i could have seen it. meteors are usually small and burn up completely as they hurdle towards the earth's surface. we even have a nickname for them. called shooting stars. today's meteor seemed much more imperfect and was captured by dozens of amateur videos. one thousand people were injured. most of them suffering cuts from flying glass. the damage and the injuries were the end result of a sonic boom. >> the blast was strong enough to blow out windows, doors, a local school teacher said that kind of light doesn't happen in life, only at the end of the world. city administrators said we thought an airplane had crashed. children were sent h
continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: we begin tonight with a look at the crises in syria. nearly 70,000 people have died in one of the most deadly civil wars in recent history. two years in and the community has debated how to intervene. the united states hasiven nearly $400 million in humanitarian aid. he's remained fragmented and disorganized. as the violence skates the united states has increasing efforts to arm the groups. joining me is michael gordon the chief military correspondent for the "new york times." i'm please to do have him on this program. welcome. >> nice to be here. >> much to talk about. let me begin with syria. we all know from congressional testimony from leon panetta the former sect of defense and others that there was a recommendation from leon panetta and from david petraeus at ci and from hillary clinton at state to do something. >> so what happened, i believe, and i did a lot of reporting on it. and actually it was an article that i worked on with mark rangler that was the basis
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 76 (some duplicates have been removed)